About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
KPIX (CBS) 13
CSPAN 8
WUSA (CBS) 8
WHUT (Howard University Television) 5
CNN 3
CNNW 3
CSPAN2 3
KQED (PBS) 2
MSNBCW 2
WETA 2
KGO (ABC) 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
MSNBC 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 57
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)
. you could almost say cia directors are not indispensable, they're disposable. david martin, cbs news, the pentagon. >>> cbs news has learned president obama will likely nominate u.n. ambassador susan rice to replace hillary clinton as secretary of state. rice may face a tough confirmation process, though. republicans have criticized her response to the september 11th assault in benghazi. rice said it was a spontaneous response to anti-american protests in cairo and not a coordinated attack. >>> congress returns today with an agenda dominated to avoid the so called fiscal cliff, the combination of tax expense increases and spending cuts. president obama meets with top ceos tomorrow to discuss the issue. on friday, mr. obama meets with congressional leaders. >>> new york governor andrew cuomo is asking the federal government for $30 billion in aid to help his state rebuild following hurricane sandy. two weeks after the storm, tens of thousands of customers remain without power in the hardest hit sections of new york and new jersey. some 55,000 of them on long island. cuomo says the lon
have a run in on the track. >>> this is the "cbs morning news" for monday, november 12, 2012. >>> good morning. good to be with you. i'm terrell brown. we begin with the resignation of cia director david petraeus. lawmakers want to know if national security was compromised by the extramarital affair that forced him to step down and why they weren't told sooner. it was harassing emails allegedly from petraeus' mistress to another woman that triggered an fbi probe. tara mergener is in washington with details. good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning. jill kelly took her concerns to the fbi several months ago eventually exposing the affair. now congress is demanding more details. cbs news has learned this woman 37-year-old jill kelly triggered an fbi investigation leading to the resignation of cia director david petraeus. petraeus resigned friday after word got out he was having an affair with his biographer paula broadwell. his resignation caught many on capitol hill offguard. >> it was like a lightning bolt. >> reporter: kelly went to the fbi after allegedly receiving emails from
, during and after the attack if general petraeus doesn't testify. >> reporter: cbs news has learned that general petraeus visited libya last month and called several members of congress the week before he resigned to give him his assessment ever the attack. randall -- of the attack. ran disal pinkston, cbs news -- randall pinkston, cbs news, washington. >> the f.b.i. began investigating petraeus after a woman said broadwell was sending her harassing e- mails. >>> parades marked veterans day on sunday from coast to coast. at arlington national cemetery, president obama paid tribute to those who didn't make it back home alive. the president said the wreath he laid at the tomb of the unknown is intended to remember every service member who has ever worn our nation's uniform. he urged americans to be there for returning veterans and their families, not just now but always. the president also noted this was the first veterans day in a decade with no american troops fighting in iraq. >>> and this is video from the new york city veterans day parade. thousands lined the streets of manhattan
this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening an american soldier accused of a horrific war crime watched in a courtroom as children described the murders of their families. there were two days of testimony in the case of staff sergeant robert bales. bales is charged with 16 counts of pre-meditated murder and six counts of attempted murder. prosecutors say that for reasons unknown bales walked off his post in afghanistan in the middle of the night then shot and stabbed civilians in two villages. the hearing at a military post in washington state was called to decide whether there is enough evidence to court-martial bales. john blackstone has been covering in the courtroom. >> reporter: staff sergeant bales watched the video feed from afghanistan show nothing reaction as ten afghans told of the night their two villages were awakened by gunshots. nine of the murder victims were children. the massacre was one of the worst crimes attributed to a u.s. serviceman in decades. a seven-year-old named rabin that told the court her father was shot right through the throat and chest
was stopped. when the "cbs evening news" continues. niversal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a langua>6ge all its ownc with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. >> pelley: we've learned today that federal investigators long ago had questions about the specialty pharmacy linked to that meningitis outbreak. the outbreak, linked to contaminated drugs, has spread across 19 states with more than 400 cases and 32 deaths. jim axelrod tells us that congress has summoned the man who runs that pharmacy. >> reporter: this 22-year-old college yearbook picture of barry cadden is one of the few public images of the president of new england compounding center. that will change tomorrow when he's called to capitol hill to testify about the 32 meningitis deaths traced to drugs made by his company. congressman cliff stearns chairs the energy and commerce subcommittee that's investigating. >> i have the right to say there's a debacle here, there's malfeasance, somebody's culpable, come to me and explain why, 32 americans have died, 450 are in t
and evil was not going to leave. captioning snsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. general john allen, the general in charge of the war in afghanistan, is under investigation tonight in connection with the same woman who helped bring down the director of the c.i.a., retired general david petraeus. now general allen's nomination to be supreme allied commander of nato is on hold. two of the top military men of their generation have been brought low by their acquaintance with jill kelley, a tampa socialite seen here at her home with the story playing on the t.v. behind her. last spring, kelley complained to the f.b.i. of receiving harassing anonymous e-mails. turned out, those e-mails had been written by a jealous paula broadwell. the investigation then exposed broadwell's affair with c.i.a. director david petraeus. then the f.b.i. found an e-mail trail linking kelley to general allen. and tonight bob orr picks up the story for us from there. bob? >> reporter: good evening, scott, well, the announcement came in the middle of the night on board
on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and good morning again. we want to get right to the story in the middle east. , israel continuing to amass troops on the period with gaza. three israelis are dead, more than 50 wounded by rocket fire. the airstrikes go on. the question now, will the israelis send their ground troops into gaza? we're going first this morning to alan pizzey who is in tel aviv. allen. >> reporter: good morning, bob. overnight the israelis continued to pound positions in gaza. they've expand their operation away from just purely military targets into the hamas infrastructure. interestingly overnight hamas did not send any rockets into israel but they started again when dawn broke and around about lunchtime here in tel aviv, two long-range missiles were aimed at tel aviv, intercepted by the iron dome system, a new system the israelis put in that detects and interprets rockets in the air. it's been fairly successful. here in tel aviv you wouldn't know anything is going on. the siren
said "it's over. he's not coming back." captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. late today president obama accepted the resignation of the director of central intelligence, david petraeus. petraeus acknowledged having an extramarital affair. we have learned that for the last few months the f.b.i. has been investigating the communications of petraeus. law enforcement sources tell bob orr there was concern about e-mails that the c.i.a. director was exchanging with a woman who is a journalist. additional sources tell us those communications involved paula broadwell, seen here with petraeus on a department plane. broadwell, 39 years old, published a book last year on petraeus' time as the general in charge in afghanistan. broadwell is a harvard university research associate and she spent time in afghanistan with petraeus. she is a west point graduate, as is petraeus. we have tried to reach broadwell today but we have not heard back. before this sudden development, it would have been hard to find edyone in washington admire
is released from custody when the "cbs evening news" continues. teaching the perfect swing begins with back pain and a choice. take advil, and maybe have to take up to four in a day. or take aleve, which can relieve pain all day with just two pills. good eye. who have used androgel 1%, there's big news. presenting androgel 1.62%. both are used to treat men with low testosterone. androgel 1.62% is from the makers of the number one prescribed testosterone replacement therapy. it raises your testosterone levels, and... is concentrated, so you could use less gel. and with androgel 1.62%, you can save on your monthly prescription. [ male announcer ] dosing and application sites between these products differ. women and children should avoid contact with application sites. discontinue androgel and call your doctor if you see unexpected signs of early puberty in a child, or, signs in a woman which may include changes in body hair or a large increase in acne, possibly due to accidental exposure. men with breast cancer or who have or might have prostate cancer, and women who are, or may become pregna
. and this is "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: good morning, again. on this veteran's day. and we begin with senator graham who is in clemson, south carolina. senator, thank you for coming. you are on the armed services committee, of course, so i want to start out with this out-of-the blue thunderbolt that hit washington friday concerning david petraeus the c.i.a. director. he resigned, saying he had exercised bad judgment and had an affair. cbs news and several other agencies have now confirmed that the f.b.i. got on to this after a third woman told them she had received threatening e-mails from the woman he has reported to have had the affair with. so i guess i would just simply start, do you have any additional information to any of this? >> no, not really. i was just as surprised and from a national point of view, general petraeus turned around iraq. we were losing in iraq when he took over. we had it in awe good spot. unfortunately, i think the obama administration fumbled the ball with iraq. but he t
in an extramarital affair. agents left carrying several boxes of documents. officials have told cbs news that that began to surface in june when broadwale e-mailed kelley telling her to stay away from petraeus. this was about the same time that broadwell and petraeus broke off their affair. when petraeus learned she was sending harassing e-mails to kelley, he asked her to stop. she has hired a high-powered legal team including john edwards counsel, abbe lowell. friends and former aides say petraeus did not intend to resign from his job until it became clear that the scandal would become public. they now say petraeus is extremely remorseful. >> he said in those words, i screwed up. what i did was wrong. there's no excuses for it. and he's not going to try to explain it away. >> colonel peter mansoor worked directly with petraeus from the summer of 2006 to 2008 and spoke with him several times since the scandal broke friday. mansoor says broadwell was given extended access to the general. >> i found it odd that he would allow someone to have this extensive embed. it
later. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." i'm charlie rose in new york. norah o'donnell is in washington. the united states is stepping in to try to prevent a wider war between israel and hamas. >> that's right. secretary of state hillary clinton is now on her way to the middle east this morning to meet with leaders from both sides. bill plante is in cambodia the last stop in president obama's asian tour, where the white housemaid that surprise announcement just this morning. >> reporter: good morning. the president has spent much of his time on this trip on the phone with mideast leaders, looking for a way to end the rocket fire and to avoid an israeli ground offensive. now, after early morning calls today to the leaders of israel and egypt, he has deepened u.s. involvement, sending secretary of state clinton to the region. >> the goal throughout that trip is for everybody to use their influence and their voices to encourage a peaceful outcome. our bottom line is that peace has to include an end of rocket fire that threatens israel. >>
carrying several boxes of documents. officials have told cbs news that that scandal began to surface in june when broadwell e-mailed kelley, telling her to stay away from petraeus. this was about the same time that broadwell and petraeus broke off their affair. sources say when petraeus learned that broadwell was sending harassing messages to kelley, he asked her to stop. kelley was spotted monday leaving her tampa home. she's not commented, but she has hired a high-powered legal team, including abbe lowell. meanwhile, the man at the center of the scandal has also stayed silent. friends and former aides who have spoken with him say petraeus did not intend to resign from his job until it became clear the scandal would become public. they now say petraeus is extremely remorseful. >> he sa, in those words, "i screwed up, what i did was wrong, there's no excuses for it," and he's not going to try to explain it away. >> reporter: colonel peter mansoor worked with petraeus from 2006 to 2008 and he's spoken with him several times since the scandal broke friday. mansoor says broadwell was gi
fleet was retired. for "cbs this morning," mark strassmann, atlanta. >> cbs news travel editor peter greenberg has been reporting on this story for years. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, norah. >> what do you make of this ruling? >> no dispute of the fact that the con nenlt airlines mechanic dropped that piece of metal and no dispute that the concord hit it. there has always been overwhelming evidence that there were other factors involved. for example, this particular plane was overweight, overloaded. its center of gravity was affected. it was overfueled. there were multiple cases of complete tire disintegrations over the history of the concord that never had been fixed. it was missing a key component part of its landing gear on the nose. they didn't find that until two days after a crash in a hangar. and then there were two other factors, norah. right before this plane pushed back from gate -- already running an hour and a half late. he was informed by the tower that the wind velocity suddenly changed. it was now a tail wind. he ignored it and said he was going to take off
you. also in washington cbs news political director john dickerson. good morning. >> hi, charlie. >> is the white house correct to read the election mandate that the country wants to see taxes raised on those who earn more than $250,000 a year? >> well that certainly is what the exit polls showed us. there was support for those polled for the president's position. the president has had lots of support for that position going back months and months. after the 2010 congressional elections when they won in that wave election that's still where the public was. having a public behind him has not helped the president in previous negotiations. of course, things have changed now. >> what do you think the mood is for compromise now? we've listened to speaker boehner. the president will make his case today. is there generally a mood that enough of this dysfunction, let's get things done and let's compromise, as long as we don't cross over our principles? >> yeah. i think there is a mood for compromise. the question is -- it will be interesting to watch the theater he
correspondent with abc news. two cbs colleagues, norah o'donnell my cohost and john miller correspondent at cbs news wh is frequently with me on cbs this morning. i'm please to do have all of them here. we'll be joined by norah and john in just a moment. martha tell me about general petraeus. do you know him. what is it about this story that surprises you most? >> well, i have known general petraeus and covered him in war zones for about a decade and what surprised me most is he seems like a man who is so disciplined and so careful about his image andbout his retation that it was jaw dropping to me when i first heard it. >> rose: so the question is what didn't you understand about him? >> well, i mean i may not understand everything about him now but i was surprised that he would allow this i guess failure of discipline. he really does guard his reputation so well. he watch the people who are around him. but he granted paula broadwell this unprecedent the act sessments we've had access to general petraeus throughout the years when he wants us around, when he wants to tell us something. this w
. two cbs colleagues, norah o'donnell my cohost and john miller correspondent at cbs news who is frequently with me on cbs this morning. i'm please to do have all of them here. we'll be joined by norah and john in just a moment. martha tell me about general petraeus. do you know him. what is it about this story that surprises you most? >> well, i have known general petraeus and covered him in war zones for about a decade and what surprised me most is he seems like a man who is so disciplined and so careful about his image and about his reputation that it was jaw dropping to me when i first heard it. >> rose: so the question is what didn't you understand about him? >> well, i mean i may not understand everything about him now but i was surprised that he would allow this i guess failure of discipline. he really does guard his reputation so well. he watch the people who are around him. but he granted paula broadwell this unprecedent the act sessments we've had access to general petraeus throughout the years when he wants us around, when he wants to tell us something. this was d
assistant director of the fbi and senior correspondent for cbs news and ron kessler, chief washington correspondent of newsmax.com and author of "the secrets of the fbi." john, let me start with you. what more can you tell us about this fbi agent who originally got the complaint, i guess, is the right word, from jill kelley about the e-mails? >> so as this picture unfolds, erin, what we learn about jill kelley, she is very adept at making connections with people, net working those connections and hanging on to those people and figuring out how they might come in handy later. this is a case like that. so she goes as a class member in the fbi's citizens' academy at the tampa field office. this is a thing where you're hand-selected to be a member of the class among community leaders. it goes on for eight or ten weeks, and you go twice a week, and they give you abbreviation on all of the fbi programs, and this agent gives one of the briefings for his squad and she chats with him after they exchange cards. and they stay in touch. when she starts getting the weird e-mails, she calls him up
. with all of this news, cbs is calling new hampshire for president obama. bill fletcher, your reflections at this moment. >> is the question is about drawing the line. i think it is about strategy. we talk a lot about drawing lines. we talked about disagreements with different mainstream politicians. politics is about strategy, so it is not a question about if obama has nine done -- not done x, y, and z, the question is what are we capable of doing? otherwise this becomes a complete abstraction, and going back to something laura says, i do not know people who put all their time into the electoral politics. i know very few people to sink all of their energy into it. what i do know is a lot of people who stay away from the discussion of a long term electra roles strategy -- electorial strategy, or they jump in, thinking that is a time to wave the flag and express moral outrage with all kinds of capital as politicians, rather than thinking what are the steps we have to take to actually win power? how do we build a movement that has an electoral arm that and dances in -- that advances the peo
and the city wants to be ready when business is ready. in san jose, len ramirez, cbs 5. >>> new details tonight in a san jose murder mystery. police have just named a suspect. officers got a 911 call from a home on evangeline drive at 5:30 a.m. cbs 5 reporter joe vazquez shows us who investigators are looking for. >> reporter: he is the man who lives in this home behind me the home where the body was found. let me show you his picture just released within the hour from the san jose police department. his name is troy nosenzo wanted for suspicion of homicide. san jose police are asking for help from the public to find him. >> he is wanted. there is enough information that the detectives feel confident he is involved and so at this point, that's the reason we felt very strongly to release his information in hopes of somebody calling it in. >> reporter: police are not releasing the name of the victim. they are only saying it was a woman. they are not even saying if she lived here. what we do know is that the suspect, troy nosenzo is married to patricia nosenzo who also lives here. she hasn't been
about this controversial case on cbs "this morning." your local news is coming up right after the break. >>> welcome back to cbs "this morning." police in central washington thought they had their man in the murder of a high school senior. then a new witness stepped forward with information that threatened to blow this case wide-open. tomorrow night on "48 hours" peter van zandt reports. >> mackenzie cowell of wenatchee, washington was bright, beautiful and full of life. the senior had a keen interest in fashion and the performing arts. and she took courses at a local beauty school. >> mackenzie was a very energetic and motivated person. she had a schedule that was so full that i don't know how she even did it. >> reporter: on a clear and child february day in 2009 mackenzie simply disappeared. >> mackenzie cowell is a student here. it's 3:00. she leaves out this for right here. and she walks over to her car. she gets in. she drives out. she's never seen alive again. >> reporter: four days after she disappeared her body was found along the bank of the columbia river. suspect after suspe
as eyewitness news continues right here on cbs 5 ,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,, to an end -- wildfire seaso. state fire officials say itl en for >>> as we approach the busy holiday season, wildfire season comes to an end. the officials say it tell end at 8:00 tomorrow morning for much of the south bay and east bay. cal fire says cooler temperatures and rape this past week reduced wildfire danger. the declaration ends the bay area burn suspension that has been in effect since may 25th. >>> for the first time in more than a quarter century. marin county has a skating rink. believed to be the first one set up since an indoor one close inside 1985. you can represent skates and hit the -- you can rent skates and hit the ice for $15 a person. >>> yes. we had frost, it got to 30 degrees last night. sapbt rosa at 32. -- santa rosa at 32. good evening, everybody. look at how well we paired after a frosty start in the bay area. highs between 6 and 8 degrees below normal. slightly warmer than yesterday. the middle 50s ark long the seashore. 50, 60, central bay, 62 in san jose. that is not too far off of the mark
a cbs news story. host: this from nbc news, i apologize. bam >> former u.s. senator evan bayh discusses about the fiscal cliff. then, the global reaction to president obama's reelection. does your e-mail, phone calls, and tweets, "washington journal wife, tuesday. -- live, tuesday. >> congress is back to mar with the ussr representatives. -- tomorrow with the us house of representatives. also at 2:00, and c-span2, live coverage of the senate as members resumed consideration of the sportsman's bill. congressional leaders go to the white house on friday to meet with president obama about kissell issues. >> i enjoy watching booked tv and the rebroadcasts of various television news programs. coverage of the fence about all of the sound bites and the editing ec on other programs. it gives me an opportunity to consume the news and information and make up my own mind about what is going on. c-span is a great way to get an unfiltered view of the day's events. >> dear kengo is watching c-span on comcast. -- derek hill is watching c-span on comcast. but you as a public service by your television
joined abc news in 1963 could i joined cbs in 1957. if my arithmetic is right come together we represent more than 100 years of journalistic experience. that's enough to depress anybody. [laughter] so, ted, what in god's name have we learned about our craft of journalism in all of these things? >> i think we have learned not to make predictions. >> i predict that your title, provocative as it may be, may be premature. i think that when americans finally realize how bad things are and what terrible straits our political system is in, i think that may be a resurgence of the kind of journalism that you and i grew up with. >> that is a marvelous very optimistic. >> actually it's a very terrible thought because it suggests the ship almost has to sink before people are willing to jump back into the lifeboats. >> but do you think that we can truly even define journalism? if somebody walked into the room right now and said what are they talking about? journalism. explain it to that guy. >> i think the simplest way to explain it is to to get back to when you and i were young and what you and i be
is a fellow at the truman national security project. you can hear him doing analysis for cbs radio news. thank you. that is all for "washington journal" today. tomorrow we will be talking with matt about the future of the republican party and dan about the potential for a better part is an agreement on the fiscal cliff. we will also look at the federal housing administration and $16 billion shortfall. that is all at 7:00 eastern tomorrow morning. we will see you then. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> next on c-span, "newsmakers" with mary kay henry
. on wednesday a new cbs poll showed obama leading romney by five points in the buckeye state. in response, romney officials began to suggest maybe it was really all about pennsylvania. nobody took them seriously. mitt is bringing half the republican party to ohio on friday to kick off the new romney/ryan real recovery road rally. everybody's coming. and the sons, paul ryan, paul ryan's wife who we have yet to actually meet, rudy giuliani, a couple olympic medalists, every elected official except he who must not be named in new jersey. sudden plans for a road trip are usually the sign of a pressing need to escape reality. >> is meatloaf going to be there? >> as long as he brings those pipes. >> all right. they should bring chris. this chris christie thing, is it really a big problem for mitt romney? why can't he now campaign with chris christie and be proud of it? >> it is a brig problem. >> i don't get it. that's a problem. that's the problem. >> literally, you have that image of them going like this. >> so what? they need to get over it. >>> up next, the tale of two cities. a line of dem
making news "early today" in america now. we begin with what could potentially be an end to jesse jackson jr.'s political career. cbs chicago reporting that plea deal is in the works for the newly re-elected congressman that could include his resignation and jail time. the illinois lawmaker is under investigation for allegedly misusing over $40,000 of his campaign funds. jackson is currently battling depression stemming from a bipolar disorder and receiving treatment from doctors at the mayo clinic. >>> next to indianapolis, where investigators want to know what caused a massive explosion that left two people dead and dozens homeless. the powerful blast ignited a massive fire that destroyed or damaged approximately over 30 homes. the cause of the explosion is uncertain, but the concussion was felt up to three miles away. >>> finally, it was flying day this past weekend in san francisco. 33 teams did their best to take flight at the tenth annual red bull flugtag. competitors launched their homemade aircrafts into mccovey cove from a 30-foot platform. judges graded on flight time, creativit
, cbs and "the new york times," let the sample tell you by themselves. they're not making any assumptions how many democrats or republicans that didn't put their finger on the scale. just said, well, we seem to be hearing from more hispanics than we did four years ago. a lot of people who are democratic leaning whereas republicans might identify as independents now. instead of making assumptions, it's the best practice when you're doing scientific survey and that worked again this year. >> so tell us what you do and tell us what you did this past year that made you right and a lot of other people -- and for the record, i said that obama was going to win. i think it's like a week and a half out you are putting it at like 74%. >> sure. >> and the politician says you never know what will happen just like with baseball. the numbers may look right but certain teams, ballplayers may eat fried chicken and drink beer in the locker room. anything can happen. but talk about what you do. >> what we're really doing is taking the polls. you take an average. that part is simple. translate i
koppel talks about the future of network news. he is interviewed by a former cbs reporter. they will touch on the changes in network news caused by the digital age. that is at 8:00 eastern. [video clip] >> how does one adequately express his feelings about a special friend? when that friend is also a world icon, a national hero of unimaginable proportions, and a legend whose name will live in history long after all here today have been forgotten? fate click the down kindly on us when she chose neil to be the first adventurist to another world and to have the opportunity to look back from space at the beauty of our home. it could have been another, but it wasn't. and it wasn't for a reason. no one could have accepted the responsibility of his remarkable accomplishments with more dignity and more grace than neil armstrong. he embodied all that is good and all that is great about america. >> more from memorial service for neil armstrong, thanks sitting day on c-span at 10:00 a.m. eastern. it just before 11:30, a behind- the-scenes look at life as a teenager in the white house
with this -- for this program. i ran into the following interesting thought. ted joined abc news in 1963. i joined cbs in 1957. if my arithmetic is right, together we represent more than 100 years of journalistic experience. i mean, that is enough to depress anybody. [laughter] name havewhat in god's we learned about our sacred craft of journalism? >> i think we have learned not to make predictions. >> what are your predictions? [laughter] >> i predict that your title, provocative as it may be, may be premature. i think that when americans are finally realize how bad things are, and what terrible straits our political system is in, i think there may be a resurgence of the kind you and i grew up with. >> it is a marvelous, optimistic thought. >> actually, no, it is a terrible thought because it suggests that the ship will almost have to sink before people jump into the lifeboats again. >> do you think that we can, truly, even define journalism? if somebody walks in the room and came from mars, and said what are these just talking about? if journalism, explain it to that guy. >> i guess the simplest way is to t
you're frustrated to watch the daily news. will broadcast medium abc, cbs, nbc, cnn, fox, any thing with 9/11 or terrorism always guilty before you are proven innocent and rush to judgment. the reporting is not in depth. the problem media faces with the original foreign correspondent. they will living there they come back with the real story. with the arabs spring it was the beginning of the revolution now it was a different story because now we use youtube or bad quality television. but it depends. you can still read fantastic stories and use the terrible reporting on stations like fox news. >> how would arab media of fact -- defect or handle the matters in media? i suspect americans to enjoy positioning the and it was before. why is that? the palestinian issue the front pages was day touching point* because of the support for israel so i see the criticism. president obama also helped the american administration in. something interesting, burning the american flag, you could see that in syria. or the chinese flags. have the iranians, russians, now being burned regular the. governme
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)